10 inch Dutch oven cookbook

Survival Gourmet Grub©

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USING A DUTCH OVEN IN A FIREPLACE

SURVIVAL GOURMET GRUB book 1
10 INCH DUTCH OVEN ON A WOOD FIRE IN A HOME FIREPLACE

How to use an infrared thermometer
A Dutch ovens has thermal mass or thermal momentum, so it will heat up slowly and cool down slowly. Build a fire and generate hot coals. Move the fire aside and keep it going to generate more coals which might be needed. Oak, maple and other hardwoods will produce hotter coals than soft woods like pine. Once you have a nice bed of coals arrange some of the coals in a 9 inch circle and place the Dutch oven right on top of them. Put some coals on top and make a note of the time. 15 minutes into the bake use the infrared thermometer and read the temperature. Take the reading by pointing the laser halfway up the side. Then rotate the lid 90 degrees to the left and the Dutch oven 90 degrees to the right. Take a temperature reading every 5 minutes. When the temperature is 25 degrees F from the desired temperature remove a few of the coals form the top. Don’t change the coals on the bottom. If it does not seem to be getting any hotter add coals to the top. Once you reach the desired temperature stay right with it and keep taking the temperature every 5 minutes, adding or removing a few coals from the top. Rotate the lid 90 degrees to the left and the pot to the right every 15 minutes. You won’t be able to hold an exact temperature if it varies plus or minus 50 degrees F that is about as good as you can expect.

Don’t peak. Every time you open the lid you change the equation. Go by the cooking time on the recipe and hold the temperature as close as you can. When the time on the recipe is up, bursh the coals off of the top and lift the Dutch oven away from the fire and place it on a cookie sheet or other shallow pan so the cast iron legs don’t damage anything. Again don’t peak. The hot Dutch oven is still baking the food. It took it a long time to heat up and it will take it a long time to cool down. So the food will continue to cook when the Dutch oven is away from the fire. Don’t peak. Leave it alone for about 30 minutes until cool.

Methods of cooking in a 10 inch Dutch oven on a wood fire in a fireplace.

Boiling
This is the easiest way to prepare a nice simple hot meal. Keep a Dutch oven full of water next to the fire and use a ladle to put the hot water in a cup or bowel. Keep the water simmering. No need to have a rolling boil, because once the water starts to simmer it does not get any hotter. It is easy to prepare a cup of tea, hot coco, or instant coffee. The supermarket is full of soups in cups, and noodles that are quick and easy to prepare with readily available hot water. Most of these foods in cups keep a long time.

Make soups, stews and boiled meats and vegetables by putting all the ingredients in the Dutch oven with boiling water.

NEVER PUT COLD WATER INTO A HOT DUTCH OVEN. IT WILL CRACK.

Baking
The laser aimed infrared thermometer makes it now possible to control the temperature well enough to do quite elaborate baked dishes. Breads and cakes, muffins, cookies, and some pastries can be baked in a 9 inch cake pan placed on a trivet in the Dutch oven. Many baked goods can be baked right in the Dutch oven without a trivet or secondary pan.

Steaming
Steaming is especially useful when rehydrating freeze dried or dehydrated vegetables. It lends itself to many recipes prepared without fats and oils. Do the steaming in a steaming basket or the 9 inch cake pan on the trivet.

Frying
For people who like fats and oils frying it the way to go. You can use the Dutch oven itself to do stir fries and scrambles, or use the lid as a griddle. Whole books have been written on frying and a 10 inch Dutch oven on a wood fire in your home fireplace can do them all.

Roasting
Slow cook meat, poultry, fish, or game.

Broiling
Cook meat, poultry, fish or game at high temperatures at first to seer and brown the surface then lower the temperature. Turn frequently for the best results.

 

Always open a window when using a fireplace. Open a window near fireplace at least 3 inches. Leave the window open until the fire is dead out, which includes the hot coals. The hot coals still draw air even when the flames are gone.

Keep children away. It is usually nice to involve children in the survival cooking process, but a Dutch oven is heavy and stays hot for a long time.

Choose a Dutch oven that will fit completely in the fireplace. A 10 inch 6 quart cast iron Dutch oven with a flat lid and three legs works best for most circumstances. A trivet is useful.

It is hard to regulate the temperature when cooking on a wood fire. Boiling water, cooking stews and soups, however, don’t require accurate temperature control.

If charcoal briquettes are available, a Dutch oven can be temperature controlled well enough to bake breads, cakes and other more complex dishes.

Clean the fireplace and remove any grates or grills. The Dutch oven should be on a flat surface supported by its cast iron legs.

Put a cookie sheet or other shallow pan in front of the fireplace. Hot coals sometimes adhere to the bottom of the Dutch oven. When removing the Dutch oven from the fireplace put it on the cookie sheet first, then transport it. Otherwise hot embers might fall on the floor.

Remember the cast iron legs can damage counter and table tops. Be sure to put something down to protect them. A cookie sheet or shallow pan usually works.

Sudden temperature changes can crack the cast iron. Never pour cold water into a hot Dutch oven.

Don’t use steel spoons or flippers. Wooden or plastic tools won’t damage the cast iron

Clean and season the cast iron according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.

Be careful. The Dutch oven is heavy and stays hot for a long time. Always use potholders and insulated mittens. Read and follow all the manufacturer’s recommendations. Think about what you do, and stay safe.

Sprouted wheat cereal

Use boiling water and a thermos for a hot breakfast

Use boiling water and a thermos for a hot breakfast

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Ingredients:
Water as needed for the sprouting process
½ cup raw hard red wheat berries per person.
Note: the individual grains of wheat are called “berries”.
Method:
Two mornings before serving, place the raw hard red wheat into a sprouting jar. A sprouting jar is a glass jar with a vented lid. Wash the wheat three times by filling the jar with water and pouring it off. Leave the jar full of water completely covering the wheat for 24 hours, then pour the water off. Leave the wet wheat in the jar all day at room temperature out of the sun. That night just before bedtime, put the sprouted wheat into a thermos full of boiling water. You can use the Dutch oven to boil the water. Leave it in the thermos overnight. In the morning, pour off the water and put the hot sprouted wheat into a bowl and eat it as is.
It is also good mixed with oatmeal or other hot cereal.
It is especially good with blueberries or other fruit.
A little maple syrup or honey can be used to sweeten it.

Poached eggs

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Ingredients:
1 real egg per person
1 teaspoon of salt
1 quart water, or water as needed
Method:
Normal: Break each egg into some sort of shallow dish. Be careful not to break the yoke. Bring the water to a rolling boil then back the heat off so it is just barely simmering. Gently slide the egg(s) into the simmering water. Simmer for 1 minute then scoop out the firm egg(s) with a long handled serving spoon.

Dutch oven with a wood fire in a fireplace: Put two quarts of water into a 10-inch- cast-iron Dutch oven. Place it to one side of a clean fireplace. Build a fire next to it. As the fire dies down and generates hot coals use a fireplace shovel and pile the hot coals up on one side of the Dutch oven. Coals on one side should generate enough heat to keep the water boiling. If not put coal on both sides. When the water boils, spray pam or other oil onto a long handled serving spoon. Break the egg(s) into the spoon and use it to slide the raw egg(s) into the water. Put the lid on and let it boil for 5 minutes. Use the long handled serving spoon to fish out the cooked egg(s) Serve.

Note: It’s the heat that cooks the eggs. Once water starts to simmer it is as hot as it will get. There is no need to have a rolling boil to cook eggs. A small fire is best.

French toast

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Ingredients:
2 cups whole fresh milk, or powdered milk mixed a little thicker than usual
4 fresh eggs, well beaten, or 4 servings of powdered eggs mixed according to instructions, or 4 servings of Mountain House uncooked egg mix mixed according to instructions, or 4 servings of whatever egg substitute you can get
½ teaspoon salt
6 slices of Bunker Bread – or whatever bread is available
Butter or whatever cooking oil is available
Method:
Combine the beaten eggs, salt and milk in a bowl and beat. If you are using egg substitute add a little extra until the mixture is about the thickness of syrup. Get the frying pan hot enough so the butter sizzles. Dip both surfaces of the bread in the egg and milk mixture then fry it in butter. Lift the corner and check it. When it is a golden brown flip it. Fry it until both sides are a golden brown. Serve it right away with butter, syrup, jelly, or strawberry preserves. You might sprinkle a little powdered sugar and cinnamon on it if available.

Or you can fry it on the Dutch oven’s cast iron lid. The flat lid can serve as a griddle. Build a fire in a clean fireplace. When the fire dies down, leaving only hot coals, use a fireplace shovel to consolidate the coals into a 9 inch circle. Place the cast iron lid legs down onto the coals. Make sure it is level. Because it is so heavy it will take a little while to get hot enough. After 5 minutes test it with a pad of butter. When it sizzles then fry as described above.

Hardboiled eggs

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Ingredients:
6 eggs
1 teaspoon of salt
4 quarts of water or as needed
Method:
Normal: Put the eggs, salt and water into a pan. There should be enough water to completely cover the eggs plus about an inch. Start with room temperature water. Bring the water to a boil. When it boils turn down the heat so it is  barely simmering. Put the lid on and let it simmer for 30 minutes. Turn the heat off and leave the eggs in the water on the stove to cool gradually.

Dutch oven: Put the eggs, salt and water into a 10 inch Dutch oven. There should be enough room temperature water to completely cover the eggs plus about an inch. Put the lid on and place the Dutch oven off to the side of a clean fireplace. Build a fire next to it. When the fire burns down so that it generates hot coals, use the fireplace shovel and pile the coals along the side of the Dutch oven. Hot coals piled up touching one side should generate enough heat to boil the water. Keep the fire going and add coals to the pile so the water boils for 45 minutes. After 30 minutes use the fireplace shovel to move the coals away. Leave it alone for about an hour so it cools gradually.

Hearty mountain scramble

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Ingredients:
6 eggs beaten, or 6 servings of Mountain House scrambled eggs with ham and bell peppers prepared according to directions, or 6 servings of Mountain House uncooked eggs, or 6 servings any other egg substitute product you can get
1/2 cup milk or powdered milk mixed a little thicker than usual
1 pound of bacon strips cut into 1 inch squares.
1 pound of sausage cut into small chunks
8 medium sized potatoes
1/2 pound of sharp cheddar cheese or whatever cheese you can get cut into ½ inch cubes or grated.

Method:
Normal: On medium heat, fry the bacon bits and sausage until they are well cooked. Slice 4 of the potatoes into thin slices. Cut the other 4 potatoes into ½ inch cubes. Throw the potatoes in with the frying bacon strips and sausage. Keep stirring and frying until the potatoes are well cooked. Mix the eggs and milk and beat well in a separate bowl. Keep stirring as you pour in the egg and milk mixture in. Keep stirring until the eggs are well cooked. Spread the cheese chunks evenly and cover with a lid. Leave it on the heat for 1 minute then turn the heat off. Leave in on the stove with the lid on for 5 minutes so the cheese melts, then serve.

Dutch oven with a wood fire in a fireplace: Build a nice big fire in a clean fireplace without a grate. Let the fire die down to hot coals. Use a fireplace shovel and concentrate the hot coals into a 9 inch diameter area. Place a 10 inch Dutch on the coals. Make sure it is level. Put the bacon bits and sausage in and wait until the Dutch oven gets hot. It will take a couple of minutes. When it gets hot enough, stir fry them with a wooden spoon until they are well cooked. Slice 4 of the potatoes into thin slices. Cut the other 4 potatoes into ½ inch cubes. Throw the potatoes in with the frying bacon strips and sausage. Keep stirring and frying until the potatoes are well cooked. Mix the eggs and milk and beat well in a separate bowl. Keep stirring as you pour in the egg and milk mixture in slowly. Keep stirring until the eggs are well cooked. Spread the cheese chunks evenly and put the lid on. Leave it on the hot coals for 10 minutes. Put a cookie sheet or other shallow pan in front of the fireplace. Put the Dutch oven on the cookie sheet. Lift the lid and check it. If it is cooked enough, serve. If not put the lid back on and continue to cook. The Dutch oven will stay hot enough to keep cooking. When cooked enough leave the Dutch oven right there on the cookie sheet at the fireplace. Bring the plates over to the fireplace and serve right there. Serve with a long handled plastic serving spoon.

Chicken omelet

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Ingredients:
2 eggs beaten, or 2 servings of Mountain House scrambled eggs with ham and bell peppers prepared according to directions, or 2 servings of Mountain House uncooked eggs, or 2 servings any other egg substitute product you can get
1/4 cup milk or powdered milk mixed a little thicker than usual
1 serving Mountain House Chicken stew, or 1 serving of Mountain House Chicken A La King, or 1 serving Mountain House or any other freeze dried or dehydrated chicken dish. Or a MRE that has chicken as the primary ingredient
Butter or whatever oil is available 3as needed for frying

Method:
Prepare the chicken dish according to directions. Get the frying pan hot enough so the butter sizzles. Fry the chicken dish and set aside. Whip the eggs and milk in a bowl with a wire whip until it is frothy, or as close to frothy as you can get. Add more butter to the frying pan and adjust the temperature. The butter should sizzle but not smoke. When the temperature is right pour in the egg and milk mixture. Let it fry until it gets firm. Put the chicken on and fold it over. Put a lid on it and let it cook for 2 minutes. Serve.

Note: Most egg substitute products have recipes written on the package. It is best to follow the recipe on the package.

Cheese omelet

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Ingredients:
2 eggs beaten, or 2 servings of Mountain House scrambled eggs with ham and bell peppers prepared according to directions, or 2 servings of Mountain House uncooked eggs, or 2 servings any other egg substitute product you can get
1/4 cup milk or powdered milk mixed a little thicker than usual
1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese, or whatever cheese you can get cut into small pieces
Butter or whatever oil is available as needed for frying
Method:
Whip the eggs and milk in a bowl with a wire whip until it is frothy, or as close to frothy as you can get. Add more butter and adjust the temperature. The butter should sizzle but not smoke. When the temperature is right pour in the egg and milk mixture. Let it fry until it gets firm. Put cheese on and fold the firm cooked egg over. Put a lid on it and leave the heat on for 1 minute, then turn the heat off. Leave it in the pan with the lid on it for 3 minutes so the cheese can melt. Prepare and serve one omelet at a time.

Note: Most egg substitute products have recipes written on the package. It is better to follow the recipe on the package.

Chili omelet

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Ingredients:
2 eggs beaten, or 2 servings of Mountain House scrambled eggs with ham and bell peppers prepared according to directions, or 2 servings of Mountain House uncooked eggs, or 2 servings any other egg substitute product you can get
1/4 cup milk or powdered milk mixed a little thicker than usual
1 serving Mountain House Chili Mac with Beef, or any MRE that has chili as the primary ingredient, or any other dehydrated or freeze dried meal that is mostly chili
Butter or whatever oil you can get as needed for frying

Method:
Prepare the chili dish according to directions. Get the frying pan hot enough so the butter sizzles. Whip the eggs and milk in a bowl with a wire whip until it is frothy, or as close to frothy as you can get. Add more butter and adjust the temperature. The butter should sizzle but not smoke. When the temperature is right pour in the egg and milk mixture. Let it fry until it gets firm. Put the chili on the cooked egg and fold it over. Put a lid on it and let it cook for 5 minutes. Serve.

A little sharp cheddar cheese mixed in with the chili adds a nice touch.

Breakfast scones

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Ingredients:
2 cups finely ground hard red wheat flour or bread flour and a little extra to work the dough
10 teaspoons of honey in a squeeze bottle
3 teaspoons of sugar
3 teaspoons of baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
½ stick of butter melted or ¼ cup of whatever oil is available3
¼ cup of whole milk, light cream or powdered milk mixed a little thicker than usual
2 eggs
Pam or other spray cooking oil
Method:
Normal: This is a little different than mixing bread dough. Mix the dry ingredients first. Mix the flour, baking powder, salt and sugar by putting them into a bowl with a lid and shaking. Then mix in the melted butter. Mix it by hand in a mixing bowl until it is like course corn meal. Put it in a bowl and add the milk. Beat the eggs in another bowl and add them. Put the mixture into a mixing bowl and mix for about 5 minutes by hand. Place the dough onto a lightly floured board and roll it with a rolling pin (if you don’t have a rolling pin use a clean #10 can) until it is ½ of an inch thick. Cut into 3 inch squares. Then cut the squares into triangles. Spray a little cooking oil on the bottom of a teaspoon and use the teaspoon to make depressions in each of the triangles. These depressions are for the honey. Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F. Spray cooking oil on a cookie sheet. Place the scones on the cookie sheet with the depressions up. Use the squeeze bottle and put a little honey into each depression. If you don’t have a squeeze bottle use a teaspoon. Spray the scones with the cooking oil then bake for about 10 minutes until they are a golden brown. Watch them closely because they will burn fast.

For a Dutch oven: Clean out your fireplace and remove the grate. Build a fire a little bigger than usual. As the fire is burning down prepare the dough as described above.  When the fire burns down to hot coals use a small shovel and consolidate the hot coals into a ten inch circle right in the center of the fireplace.  Place the Dutch oven directly on top of the glowing coals. Use a digital infrared thermometer and measure the temperature on the side wall of Dutch oven half way between the top and bottom. It should take about 5 minutes. Hold the thermometer about 12 inches away. When the temperature reads 400 degrees F lift the lid and drop in two pads of butter, don’t wait for the butter to melt, but right away put 4 of the scones in. Use a plastic flipper. Replace the lid. Cook 10 minutes. Don’t lift the lid to check, just use the time. After 10 minutes remove the scones, add two more pads of butter and 4 more scones and repeat the process until all the scones are cooked.  Serve them while they are hot.

Red Wheat hotcakes

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Ingredients:
1 1/3 cups freshly ground hard red wheat flour, or whole wheat flour, or whatever flour you can get your hands on
3 teaspoons baking powder
¾ teaspoon salt
1/3 cup honey or 3 tablespoons of sugar or 4 tablespoons for those with a sweet tooth
1 egg
1 cup whole milk, if you use powdered milk mix it a little thicker than usual
3 tablespoons of melted butter or whatever oil is available plus a little extra for frying

In a mixing bowl, beat the egg first then add the milk. Gradually mix in all the dry ingredients, putting the baking powder in last. Mix it by hind until the batter is smooth. Use the lid of the Dutch oven as a griddle. Get the griddle the right temperature. The butter should sizzle but not smoke. Use a ladle or large serving spoon and pour on enough batter so the hotcakes are 4 to 5 inches in diameter. Watch them. Bubbles should form. Lift an edge and check the underside. When golden brown flip. When both sides are golden brown, serve. Serve with syrup or jelly. A little powdered sugar and cinnamon jazz it up if you have any.

Out of bread? Use the pancakes as sandwich bread. After you flip the hotcake and the second side gets to the golden brown, spray a little pam on a tablespoon. Use the spoon to put a big glob of peanut butter in the center. Put a second hotcake on top and leave them on the griddle until the peanut butter starts to melt. Set aside for lunch.

Blueberry muffins

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Ingredients:
2 cups freshly ground heard red wheat flour, or whatever wheat flour is available
1/3 cup honey or 4 tablespoons of sugar
3 tablespoons melted butter or whatever oil you can get
1 cup milk, if you use powdered milk mix it a little thicker than usual, if you don’t have any milk you can use room temperature water.
1 egg or one serving of powdered eggs or other egg substitute
1 cup freeze dried blueberries rehydrated, or canned blueberries, or fresh blueberries, or 1 cup of any other fruit diced into small pieces, or you can leave the fruit out altogether
Pam or other spray cooking oil
Method:
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. It is better to mix all the dry ingredients first then add the honey milk or water and butter. Muffins don’t need to be mixed as thoroughly as other baked goods. Mix by hand until all the ingredients are combined. If you have paper cupcake liners use them, if not spray or grease 8 to 12 cupcake pans. Spray a little Pam on a teaspoon and use it to fill all the cupcake cavities three quarters full. Bake 15 to 20 minutes. It should make 8 to 12 muffins.

Bunker bread

Bunker bread with peanut butter

Bunker bread with peanut butter

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Bread like this has sustained western civilization for thousands of years and it will see you through hard times.
Ingredients:
2 Eggs
1 ¼ cups warm water
¼ cup olive oil (or whatever oil you can get)
¼ cup honey (you need some form of sugar so the yeast will rise)
4 cups freshly ground hard red wheat flour – or if you can’t get it, use whole wheat flour plus a little to work the dough
2 tablespoons yeast, if you use chlorinated water add extra yeast
2 teaspoons salt
Pam spray or other oil

Quit here for sandwich bread or add more ingredients to jazz it up a little
1 cup chopped nuts (optional) any nuts you can get
1 cup raisins (optional)
1 cup freeze dried fruit, rehydrated (optional)

Method:
For a 2 pound bread machine, (if your bread machine is only 1 pound then cut the ingredients by half) – Put all the ingredients, except the optional ones, into the machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Set the machine for a 2-pound -standard-white-bread program. Start the machine and watch it as it kneads. If the dough forms into a ball and the machine is obviously getting it mixed, then leave it alone. If the dough is liquid and not forming into a ball then add flour a teaspoon at a time. If it is all clumped up and dry, then add water a teaspoon at a time. Once the dough ball is right then add the optional ingredients. Leave it alone and let the program run until the end.

For a Dutch oven and charcoal outside – Spray Pam into a large bowl and on your hands, then use your hands to mix and knead all the ingredients except the optional ingredients. Add flour or water as needed to form a dough ball. Fold in the optional ingredients. Put the dough ball in the bowl and cover it  with a cloth. Let it rise for 30 minutes. Punch it down and fold it over four times and make it back into a ball. Spray Pam into the Dutch oven and push the dough ball into it. Spray some Pam on your fist and with your fist, flatten and smooth the top surface of the dough. Take your time and get it flat and smooth. Let it rise for another 30 minutes. Light 25 charcoal briquettes. Put 10 lighted charcoal briquettes on level bare dirt out of the wind. Put the Dutch oven on the lighted briquettes, and make sure it is absolutely level. Put 15 lighted briquettes on top. Every 10 minutes rotate the Dutch oven 90 degrees counter clockwise and the lid 90 degrees in the opposite direction. Let it bake for 40 minutes. Lift the lid and check it by pushing the middle of the loaf with your thumb. The longer it bakes the harder it gets. You choose. When it is hard enough for you, brush the lighted briquettes off of the top and lift the Dutch oven away from the hot coals. Let it cool in the Dutch oven for 1 hour. Clean the top. Flip the Dutch oven over and use the lid as the serving plate.

For a regular kitchen oven – Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Spray Pam into a large bowl and put all the ingredients into the bowl except for the optional ingredients. Use your hands and mix it all together adding flour or water as needed. Throw in optional ingredients and form it into a ball. Let rise in the bowl with a towel over it for 30 minutes. Fold it back down four times. Spray 2 one pound bread pans with Pam. Divide the dough into 2 equal portions. Wet your hand and smooth and level the dough evenly in the pans. Let it rise in the pans for 30 minutes. Bake for 40 minutes then check. Press the middle of a loaf with your thumb. If it springs back up it is done.

For a Dutch oven and wood fire outside – Using a wood fire to bake bread is really tricky. It is a difficult skill to learn, so don’t be surprised if your first loaf doesn’t turn out well. If you are willing to try it, do it this way. Dig a hole that is 15 inches across and 10 inches deep and flat on the bottom. Build a fire in the hole with pine or other soft wood. While the fire burns down prepare the dough in a bowl as described above. Spray a 10 inch Dutch oven with Pam. Let the dough rise in the bowl for 30 minutes then punch it down and fold it over four times. Put it in the Dutch oven, spray Pam on your fist and force the dough down. Carefully smooth and flatten the dough. Take your time and get it even. Let it rise in the Dutch oven for another 30 minutes.

When the fire burns down to leave only hot coals, put the Dutch oven onto the coals. Put the lid on. Now light another fire next to the pit. As the second fire burns down to its hot coals, put the hot coals on top of the lid. The hot coals should evenly cover the lid about 2 inches thick. Leave it alone. Don’t lift the lid. Don’t check it for 50 minutes. Then remove the coals from the top and lift the Dutch oven off and away from the pit. Let it cool with the lid on for 1 hour.

Learn from it. Remember how big the fire was, and how many hot coals you put on top. If it is burned on the bottom, cut the burned part off and use a smaller fire next time. If it is all mushy then use more fire and coals next time. Baking bread or cakes in a Dutch oven is a high skill. It must be learned by trial and error. You can do it, though. People have been baking in Dutch ovens on wood fires for hundreds of years.

Bug-out bread

DSC_0124

 

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Ingredients:
3 cups hard red wheat flour freshly ground, or whatever flour you can get
5 teaspoons baking powder
1 ½ teaspoons salt
¼ teaspoon baking soda
1 cup raisins, or pitted sliced dates, or diced apples, or any freeze dried or dehydrated fruit that you can get. Chopped fresh fruit is better if available
1 cup coarsely chopped nuts (any nuts you can get)
¾ cups honey or molasses, or 1 cup sugar
1 ½ cups warm water
Pam or other cooking spray
Method:
Normal: Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F. If you are using freeze dried or dehydrated fruit rehydrate them. Mix all the ingredients and blend thoroughly. Spray a loaf pan with Pam or grease it. Put the dough into the pan and wet your hand. Smooth the dough evenly. Take your time and get it right. Bake it at 375 degrees F or 50 minutes. If you want it to be structurally tougher and dryer for travel, bake it for 1 hour.

For a Dutch oven in a fireplace with charcoal briquettes: Clean all the ashes and remove the grate from your fireplace. Make sure the Dutch oven fits inside the fireplace with the screen or doors closed. Crack a window near the fireplace to allow ventilation. Light 30 charcoal briquettes in the fireplace. If you are using freeze dried or dehydrated fruit rehydrate them. Mix all the ingredients and beat thoroughly. Spray the Dutch oven with Pam or grease it so the bread doesn’t stick. Put the dough into the Dutch oven and smooth it evenly. When the charcoal briquettes are well lighted put 10 of them in an evenly spaced 9 inch circle in the fireplace. Place the Dutch oven on top of the 10 coals. Use a fireplace tool and make sure all the briquettes are under the Dutch oven. It should be level. Put the lid on and put the other 20 briquettes on the top of the lid. Every 10 minutes rotate the Dutch oven 90 degrees clockwise and the lid 90 degrees counter clockwise. Do this to keep the temperature inside even. Now the hard part. Leave it alone for 50 minutes. Don’t lift the lid. Don’t check it. Live with whatever happens. After 50 minutes knock the briquettes off of the top. Put a cookie sheet or other shallow pan in front and lift the Dutch oven up and out of the fireplace and onto the cookie sheet. Sometimes hot pieces of charcoal stick to the bottom, which the cookie sheet should catch. Leave it in front of the fireplace for an hour to cool. When cool flip it over quickly and use the lid as a serving plate.

Steamed bread

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One of the biggest problems with non-standard baking is controlling the temperature. Wood fires, charcoal briquettes, camp stoves, and other heat sources are difficult to regulate. Since water boils at 212 degrees F and does not get any hotter, we can use water and steam to keep the temperature constant. But 212 degrees F is low. So steamed breads and cakes have a consistent texture, but must be baked for a much longer time. Virtually any heat source hot enough to boil water can be used.
Ingredients:
3 cups bread flour
1 ½ cups honey
1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups water
1 teaspoon baking powder
Method:
Mix all the ingredients and beat thoroughly. Grease a 9 inch cake pan. Place a trivet in the 10 inch Dutch oven and add the 6 cups of water. Put the mixed dough into the cake pan and smooth it evenly. Cover the 9 inch cake pan with aluminum foil. Keep the Dutch oven level and place the cake pan on the trivet. Make sure the cake pan does not touch the sides. Put it on a stove and let it simmer for 3 hours.

Any heat source that can keep the Dutch oven hot enough to boil water can be used. Keep it level. Bury the Dutch oven in hot coals from a wood fire and keep the fire generating hot coals for 3 hours. A camp stove with a pot stand will work. Just keep it boiling hot for 3 hours.

Note: once the water starts to simmer it is as hot as it will get. Adding more heat will not make the inside of the Dutch oven any hotter so adjust the heat for a low simmer. Extra water might be needed for hot heat sources. Don’t let the water all boil off. Water is needed to keep it steaming. Only add hot water. Never put cold water into a dry hot Dutch oven. It will crack.

Hardtack

 

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Hardtack was the original survival food. Its use was first documented in 1588 but there are references to it back to Roman times. In the late 1600s and early 1700s standardized bakeries supplied the British Navy with a steady supply of the simple hard biscuits. Hardtack was the staple food of adventurers, travelers, soldiers, sailors and any others who needed food that had a long shelf life. It was used by both sides in the American Civil War.
Hardtack is so hard and tough that it is almost impossible to chew. In order to make it suitable to eat it can be fried, soaked in water, tea or coffee, or busted up and put into stews and soups.
Ingredients:
2 cups of flour the finer ground the better
1 cup water
1 teaspoon salt.
Method. Use a bowl, and put the water in first. Add the salt and slowly mix in the flour. Work the dough by folding it over for about 5 minutes. Cut the dough into 2 equal parts form them into 5 inch patties. The patties should be about ½ of an inch thick. We use 5 inches because they will fit into a #10 can for long term storage. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F. Put the patties onto an ungreased cookie sheet. Don’t worry they won’t stick. Bake the biscuits for 30 minutes on one side then flip them over and bake on the other side for 30 minutes. That’s a total of 1 hour baking time. Dry your hardtack for 3 days at room temperature before you put them up for long term storage.

We bust up our hardtack and use it in our lobscouse.

Russian black bread

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Ingredients:
2 ½ Cups regular white flour
1 cup rye flour
2 Tablespoons brown sugar
3 Tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder\
1 Tablespoon caraway seeds
¼ Teaspoon fennel seeds
2 teaspoons dry yeast
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 Tablespoon gluten
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup dark corn syrup
1 ½ cups hot water
Pam spray can
Method:
Using a Dutch oven with charcoal briquettes outside.Spray your Dutch oven liberally with Pam or grease it. Put all the ingredients into the Dutch oven. Grease your hands with olive oil or butter. Using your greased hands mix all of the ingredients together, mix it, fold it over bash it around for about ten minutes greasing your hands as needed to keep the dough from sticking to your fingers. Form it into a ball. If it seems dry mix in a little water one teaspoon at a time. If it isn’t firm enough to stay in a ball  mix in a little rye flour. Put the dough in the Dutch oven and cover it with a paper towel. Let it rise for about 45 minutes to double in size. Put olive oil on your fists and punch it down so that it fills the bottom of the Dutch oven. Put the lid on and let it rise for 20 minutes. Light 24 pieces of charcoal. Let the charcoal get going and dough rise for twenty minutes (a total of forty minutes rising time for the second rise of the dough) Put 10 pieces of charcoal evenly spaced under the Dutch oven and 14 evenly spaced on the lid. Let it bake for 45 minutes. Remove all the pieces of charcoal and let it cool in the Dutch oven for 10 minutes.

Apple bread

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Ingredients:
2 cups fine freshly ground heard red wheat flour, or whatever flour you can get
¼ cup honey
1 teaspoon salt
¾ cups milk, if you use powdered mix it a little thicker than usual
2 teaspoons powdered cinnamon
¼ stick melted butter or 2 tablespoons of whatever oil you can get
4 apples
4 teaspoons baking powder
¼ cup oil. Olive is best but whatever oil you can get
2 ½ cups raisins or pitted chopped dates
1 egg beaten
3 tablespoons of brown sugar
Pam spray
Method:
Mix the flour, baking powder, salt and honey. Cut in the melted oil and raisins or dates. Add all the rest of the ingredients except the melted butter and cinnamon. Spray a shallow pan with Pam or otherwise grease it. Thoroughly mix the ingredients by hand and push the dough into the shallow pan. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Mix the cinnamon with the melted butter and using a brush baste the top of the dough. Slice the apples into about ¼ inch pieces. Arrange the apple slices with their edges overlapping. Baste the apple slices with the rest of butter cinnamon mixture. Sprinkle the brown sugar evenly over the apple slices. Bake at 400 degrees F for 20 minutes.

Raisin bran bread

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Here is some good roughage to keep your bowels moving.
Ingredients:
1 egg beaten
1 cup bran
2 cups finely ground heard red wheat flour or whatever wheat flour you can get
¾ cups sugar
1 cup milk, if you use powdered milk mix it a little thicker than usual
¼ stick of melted butter or 2 tablespoons other melted shortening
¾ cup raisins
¼ cup molasses
1 teaspoon salt
3 teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon baking soda
Pam spray or other grease to prevent the bread from sticking
Method:
Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F. Thoroughly mix all the ingredients by hand. Spray Pam into a loaf pan and push the mixture into it. Wet your hand and smooth the dough and push it into the corners. Make it smooth and flat. Bake at 375 degrees F for 55 minutes. Check it by pushing on the center with your thumb. If it is hard enough for you remove. If you would like it to be harder and tougher to take with you as you travel, then leave it in the oven for a few more minutes.

One egg cake

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Ingredients:
1 egg
1 cup sugar
¼ cup melted butter
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 ½ cups white flour
½ cup milk, if you use powdered milk mix it a little thicker than usual
2 teaspoons baking powder
Pam spray
Method:
Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F. Toss all the ingredients into a mixing bowl and beat thoroughly. Spray Pam into a 9 inch circular cake pan. Pour in the batter. Bake at 375 degrees F for 35 minutes.

Chocolate Cake

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Ingredients:
1 egg
1 cup sugar
¼ cup melted butter
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 ½ cups white flour
½ cup milk, if you use powdered milk mix it a little thicker than usual
2 teaspoons baking powder
12 Hershey Bars, or 3 of those big 60 % dark chocolate bars or whatever chocolate bars you can get. It should be enough to make ¾ cups of melted chocolate or so
Pam spray
Method:
Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F. Toss all the ingredients except the Hershey Bars, into a mixing bowl and beat thoroughly. Bust up the chocolate bars and put the pieces into a small bowl. Put the bowl of chocolate into a pan of water and bring the water to a boil. Use the heat from the boiling water to melt the chocolate. When the chocolate is completely melted mix it into the batter. Spray Pam into a 9 inch circular cake pan. Pour in the batter. Bake at 375 degrees F for 35 minutes.

Note: The chocolate bars change the texture of the cake. If you put in more than ¾ cup of melted chocolate the cake will tend to crumble.

Canned Fruit Upside down Cake

UPSIDE DOWN FRUIT CAKE

Use the Dutch oven’s lid as a serving dish.

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Peaches were used for this recipe, but any canned fruit will do.
Ingredients:
1-15 oz can of fruit in semisweet liquid (pineapple, peaches, berries)
2 eggs
½ cup brown sugar
¼ cup white sugar – add more for those with a sweet tooth
½ stick of butter, melted
¼ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons vanilla
½ cup home milled hard red wheat flour
1 cup white flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
½ cup of the liquid from the canned fruit (add water if needed)
Pam spray or any oil
Method:
Put half (1/4 stick) of the melted butter into a mixing bowl with the white sugar. Beat the eggs and add them. Pour the liquid out of the canned fruit into a measuring cup. Put ½ cup of the liquid into the bowel adding water if needed to make a total of ½ cup of liquid. Add the salt, ground hard red wheat flour, white flour and baking powder. Beat it thoroughly.Spray Pam into a 10 inch Dutch oven and pour in the rest of the melted butter. Pour in the entire content of the can of fruit. It is OK if there is still some liquid. Spread the fruit evenly. Sprinkle the brown sugar evenly over the fruit. Pour in the batter and put on the lid.

In a kitchen oven – Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Place the Dutch oven on a cookie sheet on the middle rack and bake it for 35 minutes. Check it. It should be a golden brown and the center should bounce back when pressed. Let it cool in the Dutch oven for 1 hour, then flip it over and use the Dutch oven lid as the serving plate, or a platter.

In a Dutch oven with charcoal – Put 8 charcoal briquettes on the bottom. It is important for this recipe to make sure that they are evenly spaced. Put 12 briquettes on top. Let it bake for 35 minutes then check it. It should be golden brown and firm in the middle. Remove it from the heat and let it cool for 1 hour. Clean all the ashes off of the top. Flip it over and use the lid as the serving plate, or a platter.

Sponge cake

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Use this recipe if you don’t have any yeast, baking soda, or baking powder. This uses whipped egg whites to hold air in the batter.
Ingredients:
6 eggs, it must be real eggs
1 cup sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup cake flour
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
Pam spray
Method:
Separate the egg whites and yolks into different bowls. Blend all the ingredients except the egg whites thoroughly. If you have an electric mixer use it if not it will take a little while to whip the egg whites. If by hand use a wire whip and whip the egg white until it gets firm and will hold its shape. Preheat your oven to 325 degrees F. Gently fold the firm egg whites into the batter. Don’t mix it too much. Spray a 9 inch round cake pan with Pam. Pour the mixture in. Bake at 325 degrees F for 40 minutes

Note: This recipe lends itself to steaming. Put the 9 inch cake pan with the batter on a trivet in a 10 inch Dutch oven with about 6 cups of water. Apply enough heat to keep the water simmering. Steam for 3 hours or so.

Raisin honey peanut butter cookies

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Ingredients:
1 cup honey
½ cup melted butter or whatever oil you can get
½ cup peanut butter
2 eggs beaten
½ cup powdered milk mixed a little thicker than usual
1 cup raisins
2 ½ cups fresh ground hard red wheat flour or whatever wheat flour you can get
4 teaspoons baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
Pam spray or equivalent
Method:
Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Mix all the ingredients by hand in a mixing bowl. Mix them well. Spray Pam on a cookie sheet. Use a teaspoon and drop about 1 ½ cubic inches of batter about 3 inches apart onto the cookie sheet. Place in the 400 degree F oven for about 12 minutes. Watch them close because they are easy to burn.

Brown sugar walnut cookies

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Ingredients:
1 cup of loose walnut halves
¼ cup melted butter or whatever oil you can get
2 eggs well beaten
1/3 cup powdered milk mixed a little thicker than usual
1 cup hard red wheat flour or whatever wheat flour you can get
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon salt
¾ cups finely chopped walnuts
Pam spray
Method:
Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F. Mix all the ingredients except the loose walnut halves by hand. The batter needs to be well mixed. Spray the Pam on a cookie sheet. Use a teaspoon and place about 1 ½ cubic inches of the batter spaced around 3 inches apart on the cookie sheet. Press a walnut half into each glob of batter. Bake in the 400 degree F oven for about 14 minutes. Watch them close because they are easy to burn.

Lobscouse and Hardtack

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We turn our attention to the British navy around 1706.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scouse_(food) Faced with the problem of storing food for long voyages they invented “hardtack.” Hardtack was a simple baked food that actually preserved better than flour. The hard tasteless biscuits only provided empty calories, but since they kept so well and were so cheap, they became the staple of the seafaring larder. They were so hard and tough that they were almost impossible to bite, so sailors had to soak them in water before eating. They sometimes fried them or busted them up and put them in soups and stews.

For this recipe, bust up the hardtack and put the pieces in the lobscouse.

Lobscose was a type of beef stew made with heavily salted beef chunks, onions, peppers, potatoes, and whatever vegetables were available. The officers dined on lobscose while the lowly sailors ate regular scouse containing less meat. This recipe resembles the officer’s meal with lots of meat.

Hardtack

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Ingredients:
1 cup hard red wheat flour, finely ground – or whole wheat flour
2 teaspoons of salt
½ cup water
Pam spray
Method:
Mix the ingredients and form a ball by hand. Add flour or water as needed until the dough is not sticky but feels elastic.
For a 10 inch Dutch oven and charcoal – Spray Pam into the Dutch oven. Press the dough into the Dutch oven until it covers the bottom. Take the time to flatten it smoothly. Punch holes into the flattened dough using a fork. Light 17 charcoal briquettes and put 7 on the bottom and 10 on top. Let it bake for 30 minutes then flip it over and bake it for another 30 minutes.

Don’t try this on a wood fire.

For a regular kitchen oven or Coleman camp oven – Shape the dough into 4 inch squares and put them on a cookie sheet. They should be about ½ inch thick. Don’t grease the cookie sheet. Leave it dry, they won’t stick. Punch holes in the dough with a fork. Preheat the oven to 375. Bake them for 30 minutes then flip them and bake for another 30 minutes.

If stored properly, hardtack can last over one hundred years. But it is so tough that it is almost impossible to eat without some sort of preparation. Fry it, soak it in water, or in this case, bust it up and use it in our lobscose.

Lobscose

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Save money by using the leftovers from this recipe in soups.
Ingredients:
Busted up hardtack – or ½ pound of saltine crackers, crushed
4 cups Mountain House Freeze Dried Beef Stroganoff – or any freeze dried or dehydrated meal that is mostly beef – or a couple of MREs that are mostly beef
2 pounds of stew meat, cut into small cubes – or freeze dried beef rehydrated – or canned beef chunks – or a couple of cans of beef stew
1 onion, finely chopped
1 bunch of carrots chopped into ½ inch pieces (or more)
1 cup of wheat grass finely chopped (or spinach)
2 cups freeze dried peas – or fresh peas if available (or more)
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
4 cups of V8 juice or tomato juice
10 small potatoes whole with skins on (or more)
Water as needed

For a Dutch oven on a stove top – Fry the stew meat in the Dutch oven or in a frying pan until well done. Pour off the grease and put the cooked beef in the 10 inch Dutch oven. Place the Dutch oven on low heat and add the V-8 juice. Let it simmer for 15 minutes. Stir in all the other ingredients except the cayenne pepper and busted up hardtack. Stay with it and stir it for about 20 minutes until the freeze dried food has finished absorbing the water. Add water if needed. Cover it, and then let it simmer for about an hour so the potatoes get cooked. Watch it and add water if needed. Add the busted up hardtack and let it simmer for another 15 minutes. Sprinkle cayenne pepper on it and serve it in the Dutch oven. Be sure to put something on the table to protect it from the Dutch oven’s cast iron legs. Use a plastic ladle and ladle it into bowls. It goes great with Bunker Bread and dark beer.

This recipe can be prepared without a Dutch oven. Any large pot or pan and a frying pan can be used. The Dutch oven is nice, though, because the heavy cast iron keeps the food hot longer for serving

The recipe can also be cooked a crock pot or other electric slow cooker. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions and use medium heat. If electricity is still on.

Sauces such as Heinz 57 sauce, steak sauce, spaghetti sauce, or other types can be added. Powdered or canned soups can also be used. And cooks can always throw in more of their favorite vegetables. There is no wrong way to do Lobscouse. Make it a little different each time it is made. As always, experiment. Go for the variety.

 Survival Retreat Roasted Chicken

Chicken ready to roast

Chicken ready to roast

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Survival Retreat Roasted Chicken, Rampart Rice, and Chicken Forgotten are all done together. Do the roasted chicken first because it provides the ingredients used in the other two recipes. Save money by using the chicken meat in chicken salad, chicken sandwiches, and chicken soup.
Ingredients:
1 whole chicken – or any other cooking bird
2 lemons quartered
6 small raw potatoes
16 stalks of celery chopped into one inch pieces
4 tomatoes diced into about one half inch pieces
1 cup peas (either freeze dried or fresh)
16 carrots chopped into one inch pieces
1 onion chopped
1 cup finely chopped wheat grass (or spinach)
½ cup lemon juice
3 tablespoons oil (olive oil is best)
1-12 oz can of V8 juice
½ cup balsamic vinegar
Pam spray or whatever cooking oil is available
Method:
Substitute or leave out any of these ingredients. There are probably a hundred ways to roast meat. By all means experiment and modify this recipe to suit the situation. It is better to overcook it than undercook it.

For a Dutch oven placed inside a regular kitchen oven. Spray the inside of a 10 inch Dutch oven with Pam spray. Wash the chicken being sure to get the inside cavity. Push the quartered lemons into the cavity. Spread oil all over the outside of the chicken. Place the vegetables and liquid ingredients into the bottom of the Dutch oven. Place the chicken on top of the vegetables and put the whole washed potatoes any place that they will fit. Be sure to wash hands before and after preparation. Put the lid on and place the Dutch oven in the regular kitchen oven on the middle rack at 425 degrees for 15 minutes, then lower to 375 for 3 hours and 15 minutes. Check it and make sure it is completely cooked. It is better to overcook it rather than undercook it.

When it is completely cooked, remove it from the oven and cool for 1 hour. Strain the liquid into a measuring cup and let it cool. Pull all the meat off of the chicken. (Set some of the chicken aside for chicken salad and sandwiches) Cut the large pieces into chunks and put it into the Dutch oven. Pull the lemons out of the cavity and hand squeeze the lemon juice into the Dutch oven. (Save the carcass for soup) When the liquid cools skim off the fat and put 2 cups into a sauce pan and set it aside for the Rampart Rice recipe that follows. Pour the rest of the liquid back into the Dutch oven. All the vegetables stay in the Dutch oven.

For a Dutch oven and wood fire – If a regular kitchen oven is not available then do this. Follow the recipe above, but add two more cups of water. Dig a hole 15 inches across and 10 inches deep which is flat and level on the bottom. Build a fire in the hole out of dry pine or other soft wood. Wait until the flames burn down leaving only glowing coals. Put the Dutch oven with a tight fitting lid directly onto the glowing coals. Build a second fire next to the pit and as it burns down and generates hot coals put the hot coals on top of the Dutch oven. Keep the second fire going to generate hot coals and keep the Dutch oven covered in hot coals for at least 3 hours and 30 minutes. Remove the lid and cut into the chicken. Make certain that it is completely cooked. It is much better to overcook than to undercook.

When it is completely cooked, remove it from the hot coals and allow it to cool for 1 hour. Strain the liquid into a measuring cup and let it cool. Wash hands and pull all the meat off of the chicken. (Save some of the meat for sandwiches and chicken salad) Cut the large pieces into chunks and put the meat back into the Dutch oven. Pull the lemons out of the cavity and hand squeeze the lemon juice into the Dutch oven. Save the carcass for soup. When the liquid cools skim the fat off, put 2 cups into a sauce pan and set it aside for the Rampart Rice recipe that follows. Pour the rest of the liquid back into the Dutch oven. All the vegetables stay in the Dutch oven.

Rampart Rice

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Ingredients:
2 cups white rice
2 cups chicken broth from Survival Retreat Roasted Chicken recipe – put any leftover broth back into the Dutch oven to be used in the Chicken Forgotten recipe that follows.
1 onion finely chopped
2 cups V8 juice or tomato juice
Butter or other oil
Method:
Put the chicken broth and V8 juice into a sauce pan over low heat. Use a frying pan or the lid of the Dutch oven and get it hot enough so that the butter sizzles. Brown the chopped onions in the butter stirring with a wooden spoon. Add more butter and fry the rice along with the onions until both are a golden brown. Dump the browned mix into the sauce pan with the broth and V8 juice. Gradually increase the heat. Stay right with it because it will want to boil over. As soon as it starts to boil reduce the heat so it does not boil over. Keep stirring for one minute. Reduce the heat to the lowest possible setting and put a lid on. Let it simmer for 30 minutes then stir it one more time. Turn the heat off and leave it in the pan with the lid on until it cools.

Chicken Forgotten

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The Survival Retreat Roasted Chicken recipe above needs to be done first. Start this recipe with a Dutch oven that contains cooked vegetables, baked chicken pieces, and broth.
Ingredients:
3 cups or more Mountain House Chicken Stew – or any freeze dried or dehydrated food that is mostly chicken – or 3 MRE entries that are mostly chicken.
6 cooked potatoes chopped into 1 inch squares – from the recipe above
3 cups or more of water as needed
½ cup flour
Method:
Mix the flour with the water and stir it thoroughly then pour it the Dutch oven. Put it on a low flame and stir with a wooden spoon slowly adding the freeze dried or dehydrated food. Give it a few minutes for the freeze dried food to absorb the liquid. If it clumps then it needs more water. If it is watery then it needs more freeze dried food. It usually takes 20 minutes or so for the freeze dried food to finish absorbing the liquid. Stay right with it and add freeze dried food or water as needed. Stir in the potato chunks.

Put the already prepared Rampart Rice into a serving dish and serve the Chicken Forgotten from the Dutch oven. Be sure to put something on the table to protect the table top from the Dutch oven’s cast iron legs. Make a bed of Rampart Rice and using a plastic ladle, cover the rice with the Chicken Forgotten. It goes great with Bunker Bread, white wine or dark beer.r a 10 inch Dutch oven
Ingredients:
2 ½ Cups hand ground hard red wheat flour or regular white flour
1 cup rye flour
2 Tablespoons brown sugar
3 Tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder\
1 Tablespoon caraway seeds
¼ Teaspoon fennel seeds
2 teaspoons dry yeast
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 Tablespoon gluten
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup dark corn syrup
1 ½ cups hot water
Pam spray can
Method:
Spray your Dutch oven liberally with Pam. Put all the ingredients into the Dutch oven and grease your hands with olive oil or butter. Using your greased hands mix all of the ingredients together, mix it, fold it over bash it around for about ten minutes greasing your hands as needed to keep the dough from sticking to your fingers. Form it into a ball. If it seems dry mix in a little water one teaspoon at a time. If it runny (won’t stay in a ball) mix in a little rye flour.

Put the dough in the Dutch oven and cover it with a paper towel. Let it rise for about 45 minutes (it should double in size). Put olive oil on your fists and punch it down so that it fills the bottom of the Dutch oven. Put the lid on the Dutch oven and let it rise for twenty minutes. (that’s the second rise). Light 24 pieces of charcoal. Let the charcoal get going and dough rise for twenty minutes (a total forty minutes rising for the second rise of the dough)

Put 10 pieces of charcoal evenly spaced under the Dutch oven and 14 evenly spaced on the lid. Let it bake for 45 minutes. Remove all the pieces of charcoal and let it cool in the Dutch oven for 30 minutes. Flip it over and use the lid as a serving plate.

Note: anytime you put the Dutch oven on a table or counter top, put a cookie sheet or other shallow pan down to protect the surfaces from the Dutch oven’s cast iron legs.

Appendix

General Strategy – Remember this article is about food and water storage and preparation, and not other aspects of survival.

Food and water preparation

Water preparation: Store 28 two liter bottles of drinking water for each person in the group. It is best to purchase bottled drinking water by the case, but if it is too expensive 2 liter soda bottles will due. Thoroughly clean the soda bottles and fill them right to the top with chlorinated tap water. Purchase one gallon of unscented chlorine bleach and keep it with the water along with an eyedropper. Get a good quality water filter. It’s a good idea to keep a couple of packets of paper coffee filters and a funnel with your water also. Date the water bottles.

Prepare now. Make a plan. If you are looking for low calorie nappy pambey sissy food then you just blew ninety nine cents on the wrong article. The recipes in this article for people who intend to do some hard physical labor, or walk through heavy brush with a heavy backpack on all day. This is all about hearty stick-to-your ribs kinds of chow. This is food as fuel. This is grub that will keep you strong and active through the toughest of situations.

We are going to save money and at the same time increase self-reliance. Our goal is to fight rising food costs by supplementing our daily diets with survival foods that we have previously stored. By combining nonperishable foods with fresh food  from local sources we can keep costs low while at the same time keeping nutritional values high with food that taste delicious. We can improve the flavor of freeze dried and dehydrated foods by mixing them with dark greens and fresh foods, and also bouillon cubes, broth, gravy and soup mixes. Good flavorful food presented artistically and shared with friends adds to the overall quality of life.

Gourmet foods are foods that are that are elaborately prepared using high quality or exotic ingredients. In other words, gourmet foods are not quick and easy. We are willing to put time and effort into our food preparation.

The Larder

Hard red wheat is the most important food in our strategy. We use it to produce our own wheat grass that can be used in salads and as an ingredient in stews and soups to mask the usual flavor of survival foods. Wheat grass juice is loaded with all sorts of nutrients. The wheat berries can be sprouted and also used in salads and other recipes – again full of nutrients. We use the red wheat flour that we mill ourselves for baking breads, cakes, muffins, and breakfast pancakes. You can even make beer out of it. Hard red wheat stores for a long time without any special packaging at all. We could write volumes about the health benefits of wheat grass, home ground red wheat flour, wheat sprouts and sprouted wheat flour but for more information go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheatgrass for info about the health benefits of home grown wheat grass. Or go to :http://voices.yahoo.com/health-benefits-grinding-whole-wheat-flour-home-8127026.html for info about the health benefits of milling your own wheat at home.

By purchasing hard red wheat in bulk we realize huge cost savings. We consider hard red wheat to be the most important single item in our long term storage larder. It can be purchased in 45 pound pail seems to be a good deal. It will either be listed as hard red winter wheat or hard red summer wheat.

Mountain House freeze dried food stored in # 10 cans comprise the second most important food that we store. There are other products that are probably just as good, but we had the Mountain House products on hand so we used them to develop our recipes.

Wise dehydrated foods stored in pouches also have a long shelf life.

It is always a good idea to shop around for the best prices.

We recently added a few buckets of Chef’s Banquet freeze dried fruit to our larder.

White Sugar, White flour, and White Rice only provide empty calories but store a long time. They are inexpensive so we include them in our example larder.

Cooking Oils do not keep well so we will need to get some during the survival situation. Olive oil and butter are best. We will need to get oil any way we can.

Miscellaneous Ingredients like yeast, baking powder, baking soda, salt, pepper and all that sort stuff are all easily stored.

We will need the following equipment.

A 10 inch 6 quart cast iron Dutch oven with a tight fitting flat cast iron lid. Or other similar pot with a tight fitting lid

A wooden spoon, plastic ladle, and plastic pancake flipper which we use with the Dutch oven to avoid scratching the cast iron cooking surfaces

A flour mill to mill our hard red wheat into useful flour

A source of heat such as a stove, camp stove, charcoal, oven, or wood fire

Miscellaneous kitchen utensils

Sanitation – Don’t let sanitation slip simply because we are in an unusual situation. When things are tough cleanliness is more important, not less important. We wash our hands frequently with a fingernail brush and antibacterial soap. We keep all the working surfaces, pots and pans, utensils, dishes, and silverware clean. If any one of us gets sick then the self-reliance of the whole group is compromised.

Recipe # 7 – Bug-out Bread – This bread provides a portable food for travel. Start with the hardtack recipe presented earlier. But that stuff is almost inedible as is, this recipe was altered to improve the flavor and make it soft enough to chew. Everything added to the original hard tack recipe, however, reduced its shelf life. While experimenting, some pretty horrible stuff got made, but after trial and error a good tasting recipe evolved. It includes 2 eggs and ½ stick of butter. Both of these ingredients improved the flavor and texture but reduced the shelf life. If the recipe is overcooked, it increases the storage life. The longer it bakes the harder and dryer it becomes.

It is a heavy hearty food that can be cut into chunks and taken along on travels. Cut it up, seal in zip lock bags, and keep frozen. When the time comes, pull out the Bug-out Bread and hit the road.
2 eggs, beaten (optional) – leave it out for a longer shelf life.
½ stick of butter, melted – or other oil (optional) – leave it out for a longer shelf life
½ cup sugar
1 ½ cups room temperature water
½ cup honey
2 cups hard red wheat flour – or whole wheat flour
2 cups all purpose flour – and a little extra flour for working the dough
2 ½ teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking soda
2 cup chopped nuts – whatever nuts are available. For this recipe pecan were used.
2 cup freeze dried fruit, rehydrated – or whatever fruit is available. For this particular recipe freeze dried apples were used.
1 cup chopped dates (optional)
1 cup dried cherries (optional)
Pam spray or whatever oil is available
Method:
For a 10 inch Dutch oven and charcoal – Rehydrate the freeze-dried fruit. Spray a large bowl and the 10 inch Dutch oven with Pam spray. Spray oil on hands, and put all the ingredients into the large bowl and mix it all by hand to form it into a ball. Add flour or water as needed so that the dough is not sticky but elastic. Spray oil on your fist and it to press the dough down into the Dutch oven. Use the fist to smooth and flatten it. Light 24 charcoal briquettes and put 10 of them on a level place out of the wind. I used a fireplace Put the Dutch oven right on the hot coals. Put the lid on the Dutch oven and put 14 of the briquettes on top. Make sure it is absolutely level. Every 15 minutes rotate the Dutch oven 90 degrees and the lid the opposite way 90 degrees. After an hour check it by pressing the middle of the loaf with the thumb. The longer it bakes the harder it gets. When it is hard enough for the cook remove it from the coals. Let it cool in the Dutch oven for about an hour. Clean the lid. Flip it over and use the Dutch oven lid as a serving plate or cut it into chunks. Put the chunks into zip lock bags and freeze them until needed.

TIP: Use cherry brandy to rehydrate the freeze dried fruit. This drastically changes the flavor. Peppermint and peach Schnapps were tried, but the cherry brandy did best.

For a bread machine – Set to 2 pound quick bread and throw all of the ingredients into the machine. Follow the instructions that came with the machine. When it first starts to knead make sure the dough is generally in a ball shape with a smooth texture. If it is clumping and not mixing well add water a teaspoon at time. If it stays liquid and is not forming into a ball then add flour a teaspoon at a time. Then leave it alone and let the program finish.

Money saving tips and tricks – Mill flour at home. Make soups from leftover stew and lobscouse. Buy foods in bulk and process them as much as possible. Take time to plan and actually write down shopping lists and menus. On medium shelf life products like canned foods, write the date on the can or package and use the oldest first. Grow a garden. Sprout wheat. Grow wheatgrass. Make salad dressing at home. Develop and practice the skills needed in the event of a catastrophe or crisis. With a little extra effort, survivors can dine like a gourmet.


The Larder – The recipes in this article use the following:

Hard red wheat is the most important food in this strategy because of its over 20 year shelf-life without any special packaging. Loaded with calories, protein, and complex carbohydrates, it is a true super food. Buy it in bulk and mill it into flour. The bread, rolls, pancakes, and other baked goods have delicious nutty flavor. Buying in bulk keeps the cost of these baked goods low. The sprouts are loaded with nutrients and contain a rich flavor for salads and as an ingredient in stews. It is easy to sprout hard red wheat right in the kitchen. Wheat grass can be grown at home, and juiced into a concentrated vitamin elixir. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat_grass Beer can even be made from it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat_beer Hard Red Wheat is the key to going gourmet and saving money. Go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winter_wheat for more information.

Purchasing hard red wheat in bulk generates huge cost savings.  It will either be listed as hard red winter wheat or hard red summer wheat. Or simply put “hard red wheat” in any search engine and a long list will come up. Or buy it through this website and we get a small commission.

Mountain House freeze dried foods stored in # 10 cans comprise the second most important long term food. There are other products that are probably just as good, but the Mountain House products were on hand to develop these recipes.

Wise dehydrated foods stored in pouches also have a long shelf life.

White Sugar, white flour, and white Rice These products have a lot of calories, they store a long time, and they are inexpensive. They can be purchased anywhere. Since cost is such an important part of these recipes, white sugar, flour, and white rice were used in many of them.

Miscellaneous ingredients such as yeast, baking powder, baking soda, salt, pepper, and others are all easily forgotten. Get these short-term and medium-term items at a local grocery store if possible.

Equipment: A 10 inch 6 quart cast iron Dutch oven with a tight fitting flat cast iron lid, or other similar pot with a tight fitting lid. A 10 inch one is best because it will fit into most fireplaces. A 9 inch cake pan will fit inside of it, and also a whole chicken will fit.

A wooden spoon, plastic ladle, and plastic pancake flipper are used avoid scratching or damaging the cast iron cooking surfaces of the Dutch oven

A flour mill to mill the hard red wheat into useful flour

A source of heat such as a stove, camp stove, charcoal, oven, or wood fire. Make sure it complies with local building and fire codes and is safely vented.

Miscellaneous kitchen utensils (sauce pan with lid, cookie sheet, pots and pans etc.)

A big old cast iron frying pan would be nice

A 2 pound bread machine is useful provided the electricity still works

A juicer helps, provided the electricity is on

A Coleman Camp oven, if a kitchen oven isn’t available.

Sanitation – Don’t let sanitation slip simply because of an unusual situation. When things are tough, cleanliness is more important, not less. Wash hands frequently with a fingernail brush and antibacterial soap. Keep all working surfaces of pots and pans, utensils, dishes, and silverware clean.

Appendix

10 inch Dutch oven temperatures for charcoal briquettes

To get 350 degrees F use 11 charcoal briquettes on top and 5 on the bottom

To get 375 degrees F use 12 charcoal briquettes on top and 7 on the bottom

To get 400 degrees F use 12 charcoal briquettes on the top and 8 on the bottom

To get 425 degrees F use 13 charcoal briquettes on top and 8 on the bottom

To get 450 degrees F use 14 charcoal briquettes on top and 8 on the bottom

© Copyright notice – Copyrighted by Andrew Campbell October 7, 2013 © – No part of this article may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or by any information storage retrieval system, without the permission in writing from Andrew Campbell, the author.

END

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